Kaviar fakta

Kaviar fakta

  • Caviar comes from one of the oldest fish in the world Often described as “living fossils,” the sturgeon are one of the oldest groups of living vertebrates, with records dating back more than 200 million years.
  • Caviar is one of the oldest delicacies in the world, dating back to the 13th century. Before raw oysters, before Champagne, before even truffles were deemed a delicacy, caviar was coveted by kings and the aristocracy. Ancient Greeks, Romans and Russian tsars were all known to splurge on caviar
  • The salmon roe on your sushi is not caviar! The term “Caviar” refers to unfertilized salt-cured eggs harvested exclusively from one of the twenty-five different species of sturgeon, most-commonly including White Sturgeon, Osetra, Sevruga and Beluga.
  • Caviar is judged on its flavor, texture, size, and maturity. The finest, most expensive caviars have the most ‘buttery’ flavor, possess a firm yet satisfying pop, have larger diameter eggs with a unique color, and are harvested from older sturgeon. Lower quality caviar is pasteurized or contains preservatives, possess unpleasant fishy or muddy flavor, and is very soft.
  • Caviar lasts more than a day. Because fresh caviar is cured for at least 90 days using ancient techniques, it has a two-month shelf-life, but once it’s opened fresh caviar should be consumed within one week.
  • Caviar is like wine. Caviar collectors will seek out the best tasting caviar produced from sturgeon raised in their native habitat, commonly referred to as “Native-Raised.” In the Middle Ages, all sturgeon species were native-raised and many kingdoms had laws that required the finest caviar to be reserved for the monarchy.
  • Caviar was thought to relieve depression. Historically, caviar was prescribed to alleviate depression. Recent studies show that high doses of omega-3 fatty acids – caviar is rich in omega-3s – may alleviate symptoms of depression and bipolar disorder.
  • Caviar is audible. When fish eggs rub against each other, the friction can be heard. The sound of good caviar when it’s packed is distinctly recognizable as something similar to a cat’s purr.
  • Sustainable caviar is the future. Aquaculture – the farming of fish, seaweed, shellfish and crustaceans – is therefore one of the most promising innovations for providing the world with a safe, healthy and sustainable supply of high-quality seafood.
  • Caviar isn’t as Russian as you think. The word “caviar” didn’t originate from Russia. The word caviar originates from the Turkish khavyar, first appearing in English print in 1591.